Dombrowski said he “absolutely” supports such efforts, which include the creation of a new museum exhibition on the history of the park and carving, as well as the long association with the Ku Klux Klan.

“There’s nothing we can do about a rock,” he said. “But we can do something for the living people and the community in front of this rock. The way we love our employees, how we welcome our community, how we invite our community. “

Bona Allen is a leader of the Stone Mountain Action Coalition, which is pushing for major changes to the Confederate tributes. He said Monday he hoped the new management company would encourage them too.

“The Stone Mountain Action Coalition wants Stone Mountain Park to be successful,” said Allen. “And the only way we think it can be successful is to be inclusive, that is, to get rid of the Confederation and everything it stands for.”

Dombrowski told the newspaper that Herschend was about to leave the park, he was heartbroken that Stone Mountain may not be part of his life. That led him to set up Thrive to bid on the new contract.

Herschend’s lease ends on July 31st. The company has announced it will leave, citing lower revenue and “protests and divisions” fueled by the park’s Confederate images.

Herschend has been operating attractions such as the laser show and the Skylift as well as special events, shops and congress rooms since the 1990s.