The decision to get a final divorce is always difficult for any couple. It’s not the end anyone expects when they get married. Letting go of this “together forever” mentality is heartbreaking.

When you have made the painful decision to dissolve your marriage, the challenge is not over, especially if you want to go through the divorce process yourself without a lawyer. Submit divorce can be difficult, especially doing all of the paperwork on your own. To be sure that you are on the right side of the law, you have to do everything right or risk a fresh start or worse, jeopardize your future. This is why many people who choose to have a DIY divorce Georgia without a lawyer choose to use the services of online divorce companies.

Georgian law allows you to represent yourself in all legal cases. This allows you to apply for divorce without a lawyer. However, there are a few things that you need to know before getting divorced.

There are several documents to be created, requirements to be met and complex analyzes to be carried out. All of these issues don’t make a DIY divorce that great. To significantly reduce the hassle and stress associated with divorce without a lawyer, you can go through an internet divorce.

To start the divorce process, you need to speak to your spouse and find out how he / she thinks about it. This is important because a couple who can communicate to negotiate the terms of their divorce may have an uncontested divorce. An uncontested divorce requires significantly less time, labor, and money than contentious cases.

In a divorce case, specific questions arise that need to be understood in order for you to successfully file for divorce without a lawyer. Understanding these issues will help you have all of your divorce papers ready and make the process easier. By not missing any critical steps in the process, you also avoid unnecessary expenses. Let’s briefly examine some of these problems and what you need to know about them.

residence

Divorce laws in Georgia apply only to residents of the state. Every state has laws that regulate how divorce proceedings are initiated and maintained. One of the requirements for a divorce in Georgia is establishment of residence.

For Georgia to have jurisdiction over your divorce case, one of the spouses must have resided in the state for at least six months prior to filing.

Divorce suits are generally to be filed in the country in which the defendant lives.

  • How do you prove your place of residence?

In Georgia, a petitioner provides evidence of residence through an affidavit. The court relies on your affidavit to verify your residence. The courts don’t necessarily dig deep into your abode; However, there have been cases where a divorce suit has been dismissed due to improper proof of residence. If this is not what you want, make sure that you or your spouse has lived in Georgia for the required six months.

  • What if it’s the same state but a different address?

As for divorce in Georgia, residency requirements do not require you to stay at the same address. When filling out the form, you will not be asked to provide your home addresses. However, the issue of the same address will be discussed in the final hearing. By providing the relevant documents and information, you must prove your address at the time of separation.

Reasons for divorce

Because marriage is a contract between you and your spouse, if you choose to terminate this contract, you must provide reasons acceptable to the State of Georgia. These reasons are known as reasons for divorce.

Every state has laws that define and regulate the grounds for divorce that are permitted. There are two types in Georgia – Mistake and no mistake.

Faultless grounding

A no-fault divorce is preferable for simpler forms of divorce, for example in undisputed cases, as nobody is held responsible for the failure of the marriage and therefore nothing has to be proven in court.

For a no-fault divorce, it is enough to say that the marriage has “irrevocably broken” – so there is nothing left to save.

Fault-based grounding

A fault-based divorce, on the other hand, exists if the marriage failed due to the misconduct of one of the spouses. The applicant must establish the defendant’s misconduct by submitting evidence to the court.

The culpable reasons for divorce in Georgia are:

  • impotence
  • Adultery
  • More than two years’ imprisonment
  • Alcoholism or drug addiction
  • Mental illness
  • Consent to marriage through fraud, coercion, or improper influence
  • incest
  • Lack of mental capacity to agree
  • Inhuman treatment
  • Deliberate desertion for at least a year

Under Georgia divorce law, you can file for divorce for more than one reason. Take a close look at each reason and make sure you have solid evidence before submitting it.

Divorce waiting period

Georgia divorce laws provide a waiting period during which you can file a divorce suit for any reason. The only exception to this is adultery, provided you have met the residence requirements. If your spouse is committing adultery and there is sufficient evidence of it, you can always bring a lawsuit.

For reasons other than adultery, there is a specific time limit in which to bring your case. For example, if you are using exit as a ground for divorce, you will need to wait a year after leaving before you can file a valid petition for divorce on that ground.

Whether you are going through your divorce yourself, with a lawyer, or through the internet, you need to familiarize yourself with the requirements. If you have met the above conditions, you can have all of your divorce papers drawn up online. The best divorce site online https://divorceonlinegeorgia.com/ can guide you through the process and put you on the right track.

Other advantages of online divorce websites are their affordability and the speed of the service. Their services cost thousands of dollars less than hiring a lawyer and will save you weeks of time. If you’re looking to get divorced without a lawyer in Georgia, partnering with one of the best divorce companies online is your best option.

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